Choropleth Maps in Python

Choropleth maps are a great way to represent geographical data. I have done a basic implementation of two different data sets. I have used jupyter notebook to show the plots.

World Power Consumption 2014

First do Plotly imports
import plotly.graph_objs as go
from plotly.offline import init_notebook_mode,iplot
init_notebook_mode(connected=True)

Next step is to fetch the dataset, we’ll use Python pandas library to read the read the csv file

import pandas as pd
df = pd.read_csv('2014_World_Power_Consumption')

Next, we need to create data and layout variable which contains a dict

data = dict(type='choropleth',
locations = df['Country'],
locationmode = 'country names', z = df['Power Consumption KWH'],
text = df['Country'], colorbar = {'title':'Power Consumption KWH'},
colorscale = 'Viridis', reversescale = True)

Let’s make a layout

layout = dict(title='2014 World Power Consumption',
geo = dict(showframe=False,projection={'type':'Mercator'}))

Pass the data and layout and plot using iplot

choromap = go.Figure(data = [data],layout = layout)
iplot(choromap,validate=False)

The output will be be like below:

Check github for full code.

In next post I will try to make a choropleth for a different data set.

 References: 

https://www.udemy.com/python-for-data-science-and-machine-learning-bootcamp

      https://plot.ly/python/choropleth-maps/

Developing data products course project

I have made a small project which demonstrate Water Quality of River Ganga (India) in various places on-route (Year 2012) as a part of JHU Coursera Data Science specialization.

This project have two parts:

  1. Created a Shiny Application

I have created a Shiny Application to demonstrate Water Quality of River Ganga (India) in various places on-route (Year 2012)

https://ppant.shinyapps.io/Course-Project-Data-Products-Shiny-Application/

  1. Created an R presentation to pitch the idea with key features of the project, source code and other links

http://rpubs.com/ppant/DevDataProductsPres

References: Data set is given from https://data.gov.in (Open Government Data Platform India)

I will do more improvement in future to give more precise results and better visualization.

Check code at Github.

 

 

Interesting Machine learning algorithms in R

Widely used Machine learning algorithms in R

  • Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) — MASS package of R can be used
  • Regression (Linear & Logistic)
  • Naive Bayes
  • Support vector machines (SVM)
  • Classification and regression trees
  • Random forests (Tree based modelling) — There is excellent package randomForest in R
  • K-Means clustering — Kmeans package of R can be used
  • Boosting

One must check caret package of R it has plenty of function to perform many MI tasks like classification, training etc.  Finally,  CRAN is the place one should visit for R packages.

JHU Data Science Specialization Capstone

I have created a text prediction application as a part of Coursera Johns Hopkins University Capstone project.

Check below for resources.

Next Word Text Prediction Algorithm — Data Science Capstone Project by JHU and Swiftkey

Presentation:

http://rpubs.com/ppant/capstone-presentation

Application:

https://ppant.shinyapps.io/nextWordPredict/

Code:

https://github.com/ppant/Coursera-Data-Science-Capstone-Project

 

Request to use and provide your valuable suggestions for improvement.

Thanks

Stanford Machine learning class slides

Andrew NG Machine learning class is the best class so far which I took online.

Apart from the course video sometimes lecture slides are also important for quick reference. For quite some time, I was looking for them as they are not available on course home.

Here all the lecture slides available at:
https://d396qusza40orc.cloudfront.net/ml/docs/slides/Lecture1.pdf

Lecture2.pdf

Lecture3.pdf

Lecture4.pdf

and so on…

 

My own experience slides only make sense if you go through the full video course.  Professor is an amazing teacher.

 

Enjoy learning.

 

Getting and cleaning data using R programming project notes

Brief notes of my learning from course project of getting and cleaning data course from John Hopkins University.

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the ability to collect, work with, and clean a data set. Final goal here is to prepare tidy data that can be used for later analysis.

One of the most exciting areas in all of the data science right now is wearable computing – see for example companies like Fitbit, Nike, tomtom, Garmin etc are racing to develop the most advanced algorithms to attract new users. In this case study, the data is collected from the accelerometers from the Samsung Galaxy S smartphone. A full description is available at the site where the data was obtained:

http://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/datasets/Human+Activity+Recognition+Using+Smartphones

Here is the dataset for the project:

https://d396qusza40orc.cloudfront.net/getdata%2Fprojectfiles%2FUCI%20HAR%20Dataset.zip

I have created an R script called run_analysis.R which does the following.

  • Merges the training and the test sets to create one data set.
  • Extracts only the measurements on the mean and standard deviation for each measurement.
  • Uses descriptive activity names to name the activities in the data set.
  • Appropriately labels the data set with descriptive variable names.
  • Finally, creates a second, independent tidy data set with the average of each variable for each activity and each subject.References:

http://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/datasets/Human+Activity+Recognition+Using+Smartphones
https://www.coursera.org/learn/data-cleaning
https://github.com/ppant/getting-and-cleaning-data-project-coursera

 

For working code and tidy dataset please check my Github repo.

 

Accessing Github API with OAuth example using R

Modern API provided by Google, Twitter, Facebook, Github etc uses OAuth for authentication and authorization. In this example, I am using GitHub API. We get a JSON response which can be used to fetch specific information. In this code I have used my Github account.Code is written R programming languages.

Here are the steps:
1. Find OAuth settings for Github
2. Create a application in Github
3. Add/Modify secret keys
4. Get OAuth credentials
5. Finally use API and parse json data to show response


## Load required modules
library(httr)
library(httpuv)
require(jsonlite)

# 1. Find OAuth settings for github:
# http://developer.github.com/v3/oauth/
oauth_endpoints("github")

# 2. To make your own application, register at at
# https://github.com/settings/applications.
## https://github.com/settings/applications/321837
## Use any URL for the homepage URL
# (http://github.com is fine) and http://localhost:1410 as the callback url. You will need httpuv

## Add Secret keys
## Secret keys can be get from developer github
myapp <- oauth_app("github",
key = "7cd28c82639b7cf76fcc",
secret = "d1c90e32e12baa81dabec79cd1ea7d8edfd6bf53")

# 3. Get OAuth credentials
github_token <- oauth2.0_token(oauth_endpoints("github"), myapp)
## Authentication will be done automatically

# 4. Use API
gtoken <- config(token = github_token)
req <- GET("https://api.github.com/users/ppant/repos", gtoken)
stop_for_status(req)
##content(req)
output <- content(req)
## Either of the two can be used to fetch the required info, name and date created of repo ProgrammingAssignment3
out<-list(output[[30]]$name, output[[30]]$created_at)

BROWSE("https://api.github.com/users/ppant/repos",authenticate("Access Token","x-oauth-basic","basic"))
# OR:
req <- with_config(gtoken, GET("https://api.github.com/users/ppant/repos"))
stop_for_status(req)
content(req)


For updated code please check github

Creating recurring date patterns using Perl

This program will be helpful if someone want to create recur date patterns based on criteria (yearly, monthly,weekly and daily). Program is written in Perl using old version of Date::Manip CPAN module.

# Script to calculate recurrence dates based on given criteria using Perl Date::Manip module.
# All the input dates in this are given hard coded. These shall be passed through external program etc.
#!/usr/local/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use Date::Manip; 
use Data::Dumper;  
# calculate the dates for yearly patterns.
&yearly();
&monthly();
&weekly();
&daily();
sub yearly {
	my $base = "2015-10-29";
	my $start_date = "2015-10-29";
	my $end_date = "2018-01-01";
	my $yearly_recur_every ="1";
	my $yearly_on_month = "10";
	my $yearly_on_week = "0";
	my $yearly_on_day = "29";
	my $yearly_on_the_month = "10";
	my $yearly_on_the_week = "1";
	my $yearly_on_the_day = "1";
	my $frequency = "";
	my $frequency_pattern_yearly_on = "$yearly_recur_every*$yearly_on_month:$yearly_on_week:$yearly_on_day:0:0:0";
	my $frequency_pattern_yearly_on_the = "$yearly_recur_every*$yearly_on_the_month:$yearly_on_the_week:$yearly_on_the_day:0:0:0";
	my @yearly_dates_on = ParseRecur($frequency_pattern_yearly_on,$base,$start_date,$end_date); # On a certain day of a month
	my @yearly_dates_on_the = ParseRecur($frequency_pattern_yearly_on_the,$base,$start_date,$end_date); # First Monday of Oct 
	print "\n";
	print "******************************************************************************\n";
	print "**************************** YEARLY *******************************************\n";
	print "*******************************************************************************\n";
print "Start date :". $start_date."\n";
print "End date :". $end_date."\n";
print "\n";
print "******************************************************************************\n";
print "Temporal expression: every 1 year on October 29\n";
print "Rule: ".$frequency_pattern_yearly_on;
print "\n";
print "Dates:\n";
print Dumper (\@yearly_dates_on);
print "\n";
print "Temporal expression: every 1 year on the first Monday of October\n";
print "Rule: ".$frequency_pattern_yearly_on_the;
print "\n";
print "Dates:\n";
print Dumper (\@yearly_dates_on_the);
print "\n";
}
# Monthly
sub monthly () {
	my $base = "2015-10-29";
	my $start_date = "2016-01-22";
	my $end_date = "2017-06-01";
	my $monthly_recur_every ="1";
	my $monthly_day_of = "29";
	my $monthly_the_day = "1";
	my $monthly_the_week = "1";
	my $frequency = "";
	my $frequency_pattern_monthly_day = "0:$monthly_recur_every*0:$monthly_day_of:0:0:0";
	my $frequency_pattern_monthly_the_day ="0:1*-2:5:0:0:0"; # Every month on the 2nd last Friday
	my @monthly_dates_day = ParseRecur($frequency_pattern_monthly_day,$base,$start_date,$end_date); # On a certain day of a month
	my @monthly_dates_the_day = ParseRecur($frequency_pattern_monthly_the_day,$base,$start_date,$end_date); # First Monday of Oct 
	
print "\n";
print "******************************************************************************\n";
print "**************************** MONTHLY *******************************************\n";
print "*******************************************************************************\n";
print "Start date :". $start_date."\n";
print "End date :". $end_date."\n";
print "\n";
print "******************************************************************************\n";
print "Temporal expression: Day 29 of every 1 month\n";
print "Rule: ".$frequency_pattern_monthly_day;
print "\n";
print "Dates:\n";
print Dumper (\@monthly_dates_day);
print "\n";
print "Temporal expression: The first monday of every month\n";
print "Rule: ".$frequency_pattern_monthly_the_day;
print "\n";
print "Dates:\n";
print Dumper (\@monthly_dates_the_day);
print "\n";
}
# Weekly
sub weekly () {
	my $base = "2015-10-29";
	my $start_date = "2016-01-22";
	my $end_date = "2016-03-01";
	my $weekly_recur_every ="1";
	# We need to add comma on the value we are getting from UI .. if the field is not selected means no value then 
	# no comma will be added
	my $first_day_of_the_week = ""; # Monday
	my $second_day_of_the_week = "2,"; # Tuesday
	my $third_day_of_the_week = ""; # Wednesday
	my $fourth_day_of_the_week = "4,"; #Thrusday
	my $fifth_day_of_the_week = ""; # Friday
	my $sixth_day_of_the_week = ""; # Saturday
	my $seventh_day_of_the_week = ""; # Sunday
	# my $weekly_the_day = "1";
	# my $weekly_the_week = "1";
	my $frequency = "";
	my $frequency_pattern_weekly_day = "0:0:$weekly_recur_every*$first_day_of_the_week$second_day_of_the_week$third_day_of_the_week$fourth_day_of_the_week$fifth_day_of_the_week$sixth_day_of_the_week$seventh_day_of_the_week:0:0:0";
		my @weekly_dates_day = ParseRecur($frequency_pattern_weekly_day,$base,$start_date,$end_date); # On a certain day of a month
	
print "\n";
print "******************************************************************************\n";
print "**************************** WEEKLY *******************************************\n";
print "*******************************************************************************\n";
print "Start date :". $start_date."\n";
print "End date :". $end_date."\n";
print "\n";
print "Temporal expression: Every every week on Tuesday and Thrusday\n";
print "Rule: ".$frequency_pattern_weekly_day;
print "\n";
print "Dates:\n";
print Dumper (\@weekly_dates_day);
print "\n";
}
# Daily
sub daily () {
	my $base = "2015-10-29";
	my $start_date = "2016-01-22";
	my $end_date = "2016-02-05";
	my $daily_recur_everyday ="1";
	# We need to add comma on the value we are getting from UI .. if the field is not selected means no value then 
	# no comma will be added
	my $first_day_of_the_weekday = "1,"; # Monday
	my $second_day_of_the_weekday = "2,"; # Tuesday
	my $third_day_of_the_weekday = "3,"; # Wednesday
	my $fourth_day_of_the_weekday = "4,"; #Thrusday
	my $fifth_day_of_the_weekday = "5"; # Friday
	my $daily_start_time = "8:00"; # 8AM
	my $frequency = "";
	my $frequency_pattern_daily_everyday = "0:0:0:$daily_recur_everyday*0:0:0";
	# 0:1*1-5:$dow:0:0:0";
	# "0:0:0:$n*0:0:0";  # Every nth day
	my $frequency_pattern_daily_every_weekday = "0:0:$daily_recur_everyday*$first_day_of_the_weekday$second_day_of_the_weekday$third_day_of_the_weekday$fourth_day_of_the_weekday$fifth_day_of_the_weekday:0:0:0";
	my @daily_dates_everyday = ParseRecur($frequency_pattern_daily_everyday,$base,$start_date,$end_date); # On a certain day of a month
	my @daily_dates_every_weekday = ParseRecur($frequency_pattern_daily_every_weekday,$base,$start_date,$end_date); # On a certain day of a month
	print "\n";
	print "******************************************************************************\n";
	print "**************************** DAILY *******************************************\n";
	print "******************************************************************************\n";
	print "Start date: ". $start_date."\n";
	print "End date: ". $end_date."\n";
	print "\n";
	print "Temporal expression: Everyday\n";
	print "Rule: ".$frequency_pattern_daily_everyday;
	print "\n";
	print "Dates:".@daily_dates_everyday."\n";
	print Dumper (\@daily_dates_everyday);
	print "\n";
	print "Temporal expression: Every weekday\n";
	print "Rule: ".$frequency_pattern_daily_every_weekday;
	print "\n";
	print "Dates:\n";
	print Dumper (\@daily_dates_every_weekday);
	print "\n";
	}
	
	# End of script

Full working code is available on GitHub with documentation.

Enjoy,

apache lucy search examples

Investigating search engines and this time apache Lucy 0.4.2. I am showing a basic indexer and a small search application. See below code for indexer (This will take documents one by one and then index them). Search module will take arugument as STDIN and then will show the search result.

This is pure command line utility just to show how basic indexing and searching works using apache lucy.

indexer.pl

#!/usr/local/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Lucy::Simple;

#
# Ensure the index directory is both available and empty.
#
my $index = "/ppant/LucyTest/index";
system( "rm", "-rf", $index );
system( "mkdir", "-p", $index );
# Create the helper...a new Lucy::Simple object
my $lucy = Lucy::Simple new( path = $index, language = 'en', );

# Add the first "document". (We are mainly adding meta data of the document)
my %one = ( title ="This is a title of first article" , body ="some text inside the body we need to test the implementaion of lucy", id =1 );
$lucy-add_doc( \%one );

# Add the second "document".
my %two = ( title ="This is another article" , body ="I am putting some basic content, using some words which are also in first document like implementation", id =2 );
$lucy add_doc( \%two );

# Both the documents are now indexed in path

One indexing of the documents is done we'll make a small search script.

search.cgi

#!/usr/local/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Lucy::Search::IndexSearcher;

my $term = shift || die "Usage: $0 search-term";

my $searcher = Lucy::Search::IndexSearcher new( index ='/ppant/LucyTest/index');
# A basic search command line which will look for indexed items based on STDIN and will show that in which document query string is found and no of hits
my $hits = $searcher hits( query =$term );
while ( my $hit = $hits next ) {
print "Title: $hit {title} - ID: $hit {id}\n";
}
# End of search.cgi


***********************************************************************

If you want to explore more check Full Code on GitHub